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May 2016 Newsletter

I. Reminder: Register for 2016 Britain and the World Conference

Our annual conference (22-24 June at King’s College London) is fast approaching, and at this time we would like to remind our newsletter readers who plan on attending the conference to register. To register for the conference, please visit Kings College London’s e-store at the following address:

http://estore.kcl.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=13&catid=137&prodid=632

Our registration rates are as follows:

Members: faculty £150, students £100

Non-members: faculty £200, students £150

The rates are for all three days of the conference, and include refreshments (coffee, tea, water) throughout the day, lunch every day, and wine reception on the first day (The conference dinner will be separate, and conference-goers will receive separate communications on it from the conference committee).

Not only because it is almost entirely defrayed in registration fees, we very much encourage you to become members of the society, which additionally means you will receive a subscription to our journal, Britain and the World, which will be posted to you and you also gain web access to the archive. The journal is published biannually, but is soon slated to move to a triannual format. If you would like to become a member of the British Scholar Society ($59) to take advantage of the discounted rate, please register before the conference by going to: http://britishscholar.org/british-scholar/membership/

Please continue to check the conference website for developments and updates:

http://britishscholar.org/conference-2016/

II. Reminder: 2016 Britain and the World Accommodation Information

We would also like to remind our newsletter readers of the accommodation arrangements that we have made in anticipation of the rooming needs of our conference attendees.

We have secured 100 rooms at the Royal National Hotel, Bedford Way, WC1H 0DG, just off Russell Square. The conference venue is 20 minutes’ walk (down Southampton Row/Kingsway), or 10 minutes’ on a constant stream of buses (numbers 68, 59, 91, 168, and 188) which is much quicker than the tube.  There are many other even closer hotels, although they are much more expensive.

Royal National rates are £98 for a single room and £123 for a twin room if booked by phone, £88 for a single room and £113 for a twin room if booked online: https://www.imperialhotels.co.uk/en/royal-national. Guests can also take advantage of their online BOGO Offer – complimentary dinner on the night of arrival for bookings of 2 or more consecutive nights. Early booking is advised, and any remaining rooms will be released on 28 May.

Additionally we have also arranged rooms from the LSE at their Bankside House, also 20 minutes’ walk, over the river. Prices for Bed and Breakfast per night: single room with shared bathroom £59; 2 single en-suite connecting rooms, £98, triple room en suite, £131, and quad room en suite, £147. Please visit  www.lsevacations.co.uk  or call (+44) 02079557676.

III. General Editor in History & Policy

Our General Editor, Dr. Martin Farr, has published an opinion piece in History & Policy on the historical background and context of the Strategic Defence and Security Review. His insightful comments are essential reading with regard to illuminating how the current system of defence reviews in the UK came into being, as well as the reasons behind SDSR’s irregular schedule and the consequences of the SDSR’s harnessing to broader domestic political agendas.

Please go to the following link to read Dr. Farr’s interesting article:

http://www.historyandpolicy.org/opinion-articles/articles/defence-reviews-strategic-and-otherwise

IV. Deputy General Editor’s New Book

We are very pleased to announce the release of a new monograph by our Deputy General Editor, Dr. Michelle Brock. Her book, Satan and the Scots: The Devil in Post-Reformation Scotland, c. 1560–1700, is the latest volume in the long-running St Andrews Studies in Reformation History series. In investigating the connections between sin, the concept of the Devil, and early modern Scottish society and politics, Dr. Brock argues that “post-Reformation beliefs about the Devil profoundly influenced the experiences and identities of the Scottish people through the creation of a shared cultural conversation about evil and human nature.”

For more information on Dr. Brock’s exciting contribution to the field, please go to the following link:

http://www.routledge.com/Satan-and-the-Scots-The-Devil-in-Post-Reformation-Scotland-c1560-1700/Brock/p/book/9781472470010

V. Journal on Malaysian and Southeast Asian History

In keeping with The British Scholar Society’s goal of connecting scholars across our field’s many (and often arbitrary) regional divisions and disciplinary divides, we would like draw our readers’ attention to the journal Sejarah, which is published by the Department of History at the University of Malaya. Sejarah‘s focus is on Malaysian history, and also accepts contributions on topics related to other Southeast Asian societies and the region in general. The journal has recently transitioned to a fully online format, which can be accessed at the following link:

http://e-journal.um.edu.my/publish/SEJARAH/Aabout

VI. National Centre of Biography (AUS) Conference

This summer, Australia’s National Centre of Biography will host an international conference titled “True Biographies of Nations? Exploring the Cultural Journeys of Dictionaries of National Biography.” The conference will meet from 30 June to 2 July at Australian National University in Acton and the National Library of Australia at Parkes Place in Canberra. Those interested in attending may read more details on the conference, register for the event, and read the draft programme by visiting the following link:

http://ncb.anu.edu.au/biographies-of-nations

VII. Free Conference on “Embassies in Crisis”

On 9 June, the British Academy (10-11 Carlton House Terrace, London) will host a one-day conference on the topic of “Embassies in Crisis,” and will focus on the testimonies and perspectives of serving and former Embassy staff. The conference, organised by the Universities of Exeter and Strathclyde in conjunction with the FCO Historians and the British International History Group, is a free event but one must register beforehand to take part. To read more about the conference and to register, go to the following link:

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/embassies-in-crisis-conference-at-the-british-academy-tickets-24897481036

VIII. Book of the Month

May 2016: Black Market Britain, 1939-1955

Reviewed by Adrian Smith, University of Southampton

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