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First Entry in BATW/NACBS Pedagogy Series

Editor’s note: This is the first in a pedagogical series on the subject of “Teaching Britain and the World,” which is the result of a collaborative initiative between Britain and the World and the North American Conference on British Studies. Please keep an eye out for future editions of this exciting new feature.

A Patchwork Empire
A Pedagogical Experiment in British Imperial History

Christina Welsch
Assistant Professor of History
The College of Wooster

In 1883, J. R. Seeley famously called students to the history of the British Empire in a neat set of lectures, framed around a smooth, aspirational, titular narrative: The Expansion of England.[1] In the generations that followed, many who engaged with British imperial history did so only to produce understandings of that past (and present) that are richer and more complex than Seely sought to imagine. Histories of the empire as a uniform structure have been superseded by analyses that instead reveal a global set of shifting, frequently renegotiated, and rarely stable relationships. These welcome developments, though, have brought new challenges to the classroom. The perennial question of undergraduate surveys has grown ever more daunting: how can a single semester be stretched to cover the dynamism and heterogeneity found in contemporary studies of the British Empire?

The richness of today’s imperial history—the necessity of pushing beyond a metropolitan center and of engaging with marginalized voices—is easy to suggest, but difficult to demonstrate through lecture without resorting to an endless series of examples that would lose the attention of all but the most careful note-takers. Fortunately, just as British imperial history has changed since Seeley’s day, so too has modern pedagogy developed more dynamic approaches to the classroom. Drawing on recent trends in collaborative learning, my survey of the British Empire works to make the diversity of the British Empire a pedagogical advantage, one that provides unique opportunities for student engagement. The class is built around a multi-step independent research project, in which students work as a class to piece together a “patchwork” understanding of an empire—decentered both from the metropole and from the lectern.

Early in the semester, after a brief overview of the British Empire in the mid-eighteenth century (our starting point), each student selects a colony on which to become an “expert.” Over the course of the semester, students complete a series of assignments examining these colonies, producing short essays, formal presentations, and even videos or online activities (e.g., quizzes or lessons on an LMS such as Moodle). (The latter possibility can be particularly helpful in large classes, where individual presentations might eat up too much class time.) The exact parameters of these assignments can be framed to emphasize particular themes in imperial history. For instance, to develop skills in primary source analysis, I have students find newspaper articles, which in turn foster discussion about how print journalism sparked new connections and tensions across the empire. Later in the semester, students are tasked with finding propaganda posters from the Second World War, using analyses of visual objects to produce an imperial understanding of Sonya Rose’s useful question—“which people’s war?”[2]

These assignments ultimately pave the way for a research paper exploring how the British Empire was experienced and understood in the students’ respective colonies. Yet, for me, this final product is less important than the scaffolding along the way, in which students’ research is used to enrich day-to-day class activities. As students engage with each other’s work, their findings help to create conversations that reveal the diverse experiences that constituted the British Empire. Both classroom debates and written responses provide students the opportunity to explore their own connections, allowing a more active style of learning than a traditionally designed class might allow. Equally importantly, as students tackle each new question from far-flung regions of the empire, they must work to put together a variety of perspectives, giving voice to historical agencies that can be obscured when explored from the metropole.

At its core, the “patchwork empire” project should encourage students to reconsider what scholars mean by the British Empire—and whether that meaning has remained stable over time. For some students, these questions appear immediately as they wonder which colony to select. A student interested in researching Kenya or Australia might wonder how to study a colony that did not yet exist in the mid-eighteenth century. Here, I push students to reframe the question: rather than exploring the history of a colony, they should explore the relationships between their region, Britain, and the rest of the world. This allows the class to discuss interactions, exchange, and even informal empire in a way that goes beyond the “pink” areas on the map.

Of course, turning over class time and energy to students’ independent inquiry has potential pitfalls. An emphasis on student-led discussion means that the learning objectives for the class necessarily shift away from mastery of specific content to an emphasis on overarching themes, tracing moments of agency, negotiation, and constraint as they existed across the empire. Nevertheless, there is always the risk that students’ understanding of the “patchwork empire” might be too patchy. For many students, the task of research itself can be intimidating, and they may struggle to articulate key ideas about their findings. I try to foster a sense of collaboration in the classroom, working to treat misconceptions as areas for further discussion, rather than errors to be critiqued. If students are working with a wide range of colonies and regions, the possibilities for comparison and contrast across regions can push students to work through their own mistakes. Fortunately, the increasingly global nature of the student body at many institutions ensures that students come to the course with diverse geographic interests, such that their own curiosities expand the perspectives with which the class can engage.

The research required of each student to produce a “patchwork empire” is considerable, but I have found that strong scaffolding allows even freshmen students to rise to the challenge. The result is a classroom in which each student knows that their voice is valuable part of a conversation, bringing a unique perspective not only based on their own experiences, but also on their own research. That dynamic possibility is both a pedagogical ideal and a reflection of British imperial history at its most innovative. Where Seeley at his lectern spoke of the expansion of England, today’s imperial scholars have built up a more vibrant understanding of imperial history. Surveys of the British Empire must mirror that conversation, and students’ active, decentered inquiry can play a significant role in achieving that goal.

[1] J. R. Seeley, The Expansion of England: Two Courses of Lectures, (Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1883).

[2] Sonya O. Rose, Which People’s War? National Identity and Citizenship in Britain, 1939-1945, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003).

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Autumn 2017 Newsletter

 

I. Call for Papers: 2018 Britain and the World Conference

After our tenth anniversary conference in Austin in April 2017, Britain and the World returns to the UK for 2018: Thursday 21 to Saturday 23 June. It will be at Exeter University: the venue is Reed Hall and accommodation is at the neighbouring Holland Hall, and, as always, the conference is concerned with interactions within the ‘British world’ from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present and will highlight the importance of transnational perspectives.

The Keynote Speaker will be Professor Richard Overy (Exeter), and the Plenary Speaker is Professor Audrey Horning (Queen’s University Belfast). There’ll be lunchtime roundtables on cinema and history, and on public history. Publishers present will include our journal publisher Edinburgh University Press, and our book series publisher Palgrave Macmillan, and the commissioning editor will be present throughout to discuss your publishing plans.

We accept both individual twenty-minute papers and complete panel submissions. Panels are expected to consist of three papers and should be submitted by one person who is willing to serve as the point of contact. Complete panels should also include a chair. In addition to abstracts for each individual paper, panel submissions should also include a 100-150 word introduction describing the panel’s main theme. The conference does not discriminate between panels and individual paper submissions, nor between graduate students and established academics.

As ever the conference icebreaker will be held on the Thursday evening, the Dinner Party on the Friday, and the outings downtown on the Saturday. These events will provide numerous opportunities for networking and more in the capital of Devon.

Exeter is two hours by direct train from London, and there is a direct National Express bus line from Heathrow Airport. Exeter also has its own international airport, and is one hour by train from Bristol.

On campus is the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum, home to one of the largest collections in Britain of material relating to film. The University’s special collections are noted for archives relating to twentieth-century South West Writing (and include the papers of Daphne du Maurier), literature and visual culture, Victorian culture and imperial endeavour, Arab and Islamic studies, and religious and parish book collections. In city centre there are Exeter Cathedral and archives, the Devon and Exeter Institute (which houses a large collection of local archival materials), Exeter Castle, and the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM).

All submissions for inclusion in the conference should be received by Friday, 15 December 2017, with decisions on inclusion announced on Monday, 8 January 2018. Submissions should be made by email to editoratbritishscholardotorg. Please submit all information in the body of your email (no attachments or PDFs, thank you!) and in the following order: name, affiliation, email, paper title, abstract, keywords.

Registration rates and other fees are as follows:

Waged Member –  £140 / $185
Non-Waged Member – £95 / $125
Waged Non-Member – £185 / $244
Non-Waged, Non-Member – £140 / $185

B&B housing – £51.00/night / $67
BBQ dinner– £20.00 / $26
3-Course Dinner – £30.00 / $ 40

Updates regarding the conference will periodically be posted on the Society website. It is hoped that participants will be able to call upon their departments for hotel and transportation expenses as the conference is not able to offer financial support.

On Twitter our @britishscholar hashtag is #BATW2018. Registration for the Conference will open on Monday 5 February 2018. If you have any questions about the conference, please contact the Conference Organizing Committee directly at conferenceatbritishscholardotorg.

II. Statement on Charlottesville

The British Scholar Society condemns, in the strongest possible terms, the bigotry and violence of the white nationalist and neo-Nazi groups that gathered in Charlottesville on the weekend of August 11-12, 2017. Such displays of racism, anti-Semitism, and xenophobia must never be condoned or excused in our society. We would also like to offer our deepest condolences to the family and friends of those whose loved ones were lost or injured during that weekend’s protests.

As historians of Britain and the world, we regularly encounter evidence of racism, white supremacy, and oppression in our own teaching and scholarship. The history of Britain and its empire, like the history of the Confederacy, provokes complex and important debates about memorialization and public memory, particularly with regard to the intertwined legacies of racism, slavery, and colonialism. Indeed, Britain’s impact on the world was shaped by such coercive structures of power. We believe that the events in Charlottesville testify to the need for historians to provide informed, thoughtful acknowledgement of and guidance on these difficult issues. We look forward to continuing these challenging yet necessary conversations with our fellow members and the wider public in the future.

The Board of the British Scholar Society

III. Conferences of Interest

The Scale of History Conference
Australian National University, 2-6 July 2018.
Online submission system available November 2017
https://www.theaha.org.au/aha-conference-2018-the-scale-of-history/

Presidents and Premiers Conference
Newcastle University, 26-27 May 2017
https://presidentialhistorynetwork.wordpress.com/2016/10/14/presidents-and-premiers/

International History and Diplomacy in the 20th Century Conference
Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford/Liverpool John Moores University, 4-5 May 2018
Submissions due 2 February 2018
https://ihd20c.com/2017/10/31/cfp-international-history-and-diplomacy-in-the-twentieth-century-conference-2018/

IV. Report on 2017 Britain and the World Conference

Britain and the World returned to its birthplace, Austin Texas, for its tenth anniversary conference from April 6 to 8, 2017. Special thanks were offered to the person who made it all possible, our founder Bryan Glass, who was present throughout, and played a key role, as ever, in arranging the practicalities of conference.

The event went along on oiled casters in all its tried and trusted familiarity: 75 stimulating papers on 25 stimulating panels punctuated with lunchtime roundtables (a Society welcome, one concerning Brexit, and another historians and social media). There were two plenary lectures of great distinction: Susan Grayzel on gender and civil defence in inter-war Britain, and Carla Pestana’s keynote on the English invasion of Jamaica. What we found particularly satisfying was the increasing range and diversity of the conference, something we’re very keen to further encourage. Molly Beck, the commissioning editor for history at Palgrave was present throughout and discussed, often poolside, many book proposals for the Britain and the World series.

Britain and the World has always been a very social affair. The all-day beverage service was well-used, and at a conference where ice seldom needs to be broken our opening night saw delegates wining and dining at the august Scholz Biergarten. Conference dinner on the Saturday was at the extraordinary Oasis on Lake Travis (cliché though it is, “unforgettable” is sometimes warranted). The last night of conference saw delegates on their traditional outings around downtown Austin. Our social media footprint was Sasquatch-esque: #BATW2017 tweets were viewed over 40,000 times, and general social media engagement (likes, retweets, etc) was very healthy (please follow, and in turn be followed, @britishscholar). All aid the networking of persons, ideas, and publications which is so intrinsic to a successful conference.

Austin has been wonderful, but the plan for conference henceforth is to visit places it’s never been to before; indeed to places one might not otherwise visit but for a cause such as everyone’s (apparently) favourite conference. So we’ll be in Exeter, UK, 21-23 June 2018. We also want have the next two conferences confirmed, and so BATW2019 will be in … Kansas City, US, 11-13 April 2019. Myself, Mikki, and Marc have already visited and confirmed arrangements for Exeter, and Justin has been on the ground in Kansas City.

We hope very much to see you next year. Do keep in touch, and please encourage your institutions to subscribe to the journal!

Yours ever,

Martin Farr

V. Exciting New Collaboration Announced

The British Scholar Society is pleased to announce a new collaboration with the North American Conference of British Studies (NACBS) regarding our blog on Teaching Britain and the World. All posts will from now on be published both on our website and on the NABCS’ blog, The British and Irish Studies Intelligencer. This serves as a call for authors who would like to contribute to this pedagogy-blog with a post that is no longer than 1000 words. As historians, most of us are not only researchers, but also academic teachers, and we are keen to foster the dialogue about your different experiences, plans and projects in the university classroom. The (by no means exclusive) list of possible subjects includes teaching methods, the challenge of balancing research and teaching obligations, the construction of syllabi, the use of primary sources, the impact of current affairs and public debates on classroom discussions, language barriers, and much more. In order to make this as broad a discussion as possible, we are keen to include colleagues at every level of their career, who study any period from the seventeenth century to the present, teach at a variety of academic institutions, and come from both Anglophone and non-Anglophone backgrounds. We are also keen to include student perspectives. The only requirement is that the blog entry has to focus on the specific challenges of teaching the history of Britain and the World. If you have an idea for a blog entry, please get in touch with Dr. Helene von Bismarck at Helenedotvondotbismarckatbritishscholardotorg  (Helenedotvondotbismarckatbritishscholardotorg)  .

VI. Call for Submissions to Britain and the World Journal and Book Series

The British Scholar Society would like to take this opportunity to invite our Newsletter subscribers to consider submitting their research to our journal, Britain and the World, and our ‘Britain and the World’ book series. Our journal, which is included in the Thomson Reuters Social Sciences Citation Index, is edited by Prof John M. MacKenzie and published biannually by Edinburgh University Press. Our book series is edited by Dr Martin Farr and published by Palgrave Macmillan. More information on our journal and our book series, including instructions for those interested in submitting their work, can be found at the following links:

http://www.euppublishing.com/loi/brw

http://www.palgrave.com/gp/series/14795

VII. Postdoctoral Opportunity

Rhinehart Postdoctoral Fellowship in British History, 2018/19
Appalachian State University, North Carolina

This Fellowship is open to early-career scholars who have recently been or will shortly be awarded their doctorates in early modern or modern British history. In line with ongoing initiatives to internationalize the campus at Appalachian State, the post is designed for non-U.S. citizens. Appalachian State has a traditional strength in British studies, reflected in the Library holdings, the long association with the prestigious journal Albion, and the establishment in 2008 of a Distinguished Professorship in British History (the endowment for which also funds the Rhinehart Postdoctoral Fellowship). This is a 9-month appointment (September to May), non-renewable. Fellow will receive a maintenance grant ($7500); rent-free accommodation; health insurance; visa assistance; grant of $1000 towards air fare; office on campus with computer; and access to all appropriate academic support services.

Applications should include:

(1) one-page CV;

(2) 400-word outline of the research project to be carried out at Appalachian State, with a statement explaining why access to the Special Collections and other material at Appalachian State would be helpful [for information about the Collections consult www.library.appstate.edu/

collections, or email spcollatappstatedotedu  (spcollatappstatedotedu)  ];

(3) letter of recommendation from the candidate’s supervisor.

Send in hard copy, in triplicate, to Dr. Michael Turner, Department of History, Appalachian State University, Anne Belk Hall, ASU Box 32072, Boone, NC 28608, USA. Informal inquiries can be emailed to turnermjatappstatedotedu  (turnermjatappstatedotedu)   (or alternatively, call 828-262-8102). Closing date for applications: December 8, 2017. Successful candidate will be expected to take up the Fellowship at Appalachian State University in September 2018. Appalachian State University has a strong commitment to the principles of diversity and inclusion, and to maintaining working and learning environments that are free of all forms of discrimination.

VIII. BATW Members in the Press

Brock, M. ‘No, there is no witchhunt against powerful men’, Washington Post (18 October 2017). https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/made-by-history/wp/2017/10/18/no-there-is-no-witch-hunt-against-powerful-men/?utm_term=.adcd57159398

Farr, M., ‘Is Theresa May an unlucky gambler, or just a bad one?’, The Conversation (2 June 2017). https://theconversation.com/is-theresa-may-an-unlucky-gambler-or-just-a-bad-one-78774

Hill, S., ‘Brexit and the American Revolution: lessons for Liverpool’s new metro mayor’, The Conversation 1 June 2017). https://theconversation.com/brexit-and-the-american-revolution-lessons-for-liverpools-new-metro-mayor-78136

Palen, M-C., ‘Britain’s imperial ghosts have taken control of Brexit’, The Conversation (26 June 2017). https://theconversation.com/britains-imperial-ghosts-have-taken-control-of-brexit-79439

Palen, M-C., ‘Protectionism 100 years ago helped ignite a world war. Could it happen again?’, Washington Post (June 30 2017). https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/made-by-history/wp/2017/06/30/protectionism-100-years-ago-helped-ignite-a-world-war-could-it-happen-again/?utm_term=.85f528c341e0

Schumacher, L. R. Interviewed in ‘Saudi women celebrate removal of driving ban’. WHYY/National Public Radio (10 October 2017). https://whyy.org/segments/saudi-women-celebrate-removal-driving-ban/

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BATW 2018 Call for Papers Available!

 

This serves as the Call for Papers for the 2018 Britain and the World Conference, Exeter, June 2018!

After our tenth anniversary conference in Austin in April 2017, Britain and the World returns to the UK for 2018: Thursday 21 to Saturday 23 June. It will be at Exeter University: the venue is Reed Hall and accommodation is at the neighbouring Holland Hall, and, as always, the conference is concerned with interactions within the ‘British world’ from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present and will highlight the importance of transnational perspectives.

The Keynote Speaker will be Professor Richard Overy (Exeter), and the Plenary Speaker is Professor Audrey Horning (Queen’s University Belfast). There’ll be lunchtime roundtables on cinema and history, and on public history. Publishers present will include our journal publisher Edinburgh University Press, and our book series publisher Palgrave Macmillan, and the commissioning editor will be present throughout to discuss your publishing plans.

We accept both individual twenty-minute papers and complete panel submissions. Panels are expected to consist of three papers and should be submitted by one person who is willing to serve as the point of contact. Complete panels should also include a chair. In addition to abstracts for each individual paper, panel submissions should also include a 100-150 word introduction describing the panel’s main theme. The conference does not discriminate between panels and individual paper submissions, nor between graduate students and established academics.

As ever the conference icebreaker will be held on the Thursday evening, the Dinner Party on the Friday, and the outings downtown on the Saturday. These events will provide numerous opportunities for networking and more in the capital of Devon.

Exeter is two hours by direct train from London, and there is a direct National Express bus line from Heathrow Airport. Exeter also has its own international airport, and is one hour by train from Bristol.

On campus is the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum, home to one of the largest collections in Britain of material relating to film. The University’s special collections are noted for archives relating to twentieth-century South West Writing (and include the papers of Daphne du Maurier), literature and visual culture, Victorian culture and imperial endeavour, Arab and Islamic studies, and religious and parish book collections. In city centre there are Exeter Cathedral and archives, the Devon and Exeter Institute (which houses a large collection of local archival materials), Exeter Castle, and the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM).

All submissions for inclusion in the conference should be received by Friday, 15 December 2017, with decisions on inclusion announced on Monday, 8 January 2018. Submissions should be made by email to editoratbritishscholardotorg. Please submit all information in the body of your email (no attachments or PDFs, thank you!) and in the following order: name, affiliation, email, paper title, abstract, keywords.

Registration rates and other fees are as follows:

Waged Member –  £140 / $185
Non-Waged Member – £95 / $125
Waged Non-Member – £185 / $244
Non-Waged, Non-Member – £140 / $185

B&B housing – £51.00/night / $67
BBQ dinner– £20.00 / $26
3-Course Dinner – £30.00 / $ 40

Updates regarding the conference will periodically be posted on the Society website. It is hoped that participants will be able to call upon their departments for hotel and transportation expenses as the conference is not able to offer financial support.

On Twitter our @britishscholar hashtag is #BATW2018. Registration for the Conference will open on Monday 5 February 2018. If you have any questions about the conference, please contact the Conference Organizing Committee directly at conferenceatbritishscholardotorg.

http://britishscholar.org/

 

 

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New Collaborative Initiative with NACBS

The British Scholar Society is pleased to announce a new collaboration with the North American Conference of British Studies (NACBS) regarding our blog on Teaching Britain and the World. All posts will from now on be published both on our website and on the NABCS’ blog, The British and Irish Studies Intelligencer. This serves as a call for authors who would like to contribute to this pedagogy-blog with a post that is no longer than 1000 words. As historians, most of us are not only researchers, but also academic teachers, and we are keen to foster the dialogue about your different experiences, plans and projects in the university classroom. The (by no means exclusive) list of possible subjects includes teaching methods, the challenge of balancing research and teaching obligations, the construction of syllabi, the use of primary sources, the impact of current affairs and public debates on classroom discussions, language barriers, and much more. In order to make this as broad a discussion as possible, we are keen to include colleagues at every level of their career, who study any period from the seventeenth century to the present, teach at a variety of academic institutions, and come from both Anglophone and non-Anglophone backgrounds. We are also keen to include student perspectives. The only requirement is that the blog entry has to focus on the specific challenges of teaching the history of Britain and the World. If you have an idea for a blog entry, please get in touch with Dr. Helene von Bismarck at helenedotvondotbismarckatbritishscholardotorg  (helenedotvondotbismarckatbritishscholardotorg)  .

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Call for Contributors: New Blog on Teaching Britain and the World

The British Scholar Society is pleased to announce a new venture, a blog on Teaching Britain and the World. This serves as a call for authors who would like to contribute to this blog with a post that is no longer than 1000 words. As historians, most of us are not only researchers, but also academic teachers, and we are keen to foster the dialogue about your different experiences, plans and projects in the university classroom. The (by no means exclusive) list of possible subjects includes teaching methods, the challenge of balancing research and teaching obligations, the construction of syllabi, the use of primary sources, the impact of current affairs and public debates on classroom discussions, language barriers, and much more. In order to make this as broad a discussion as possible, we are keen to include colleagues at every level of their career, who study any period from the seventeenth century to the present, teach at a variety of academic institutions, and come from both Anglophone and non-Anglophone backgrounds. We are also keen to include student perspectives. The only requirement is that the blog entry has to focus on the specific challenges of teaching the history of Britain and the World. If you have an idea for a blog entry, please get in touch with Dr Helene von Bismarck at helenedotvondotbismarckatbritishscholardotorg.

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2017 Conference Hotel Now Available to Book!

Conference Hotel Now Available to Book!

We will be holding the 2017 Britain and the World Conference at the Doubletree by Hilton – University Area.  The Group Code for booking hotel rooms that are part of our block is BWO.  You may also contact the hotel directly by calling 
512-479-4000.  The room rate is $185 per night for either two Queen-sized beds or one King-sized bed.
DoubleTree Austin University Area Hotel Exterior
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Autumn 2016 Newsletter

I. Deadline Approaching: Call for Papers for 2017 Britain and the World Conference

The deadline for submitting abstracts for the 2017 Britain and the World Conference in Austin, TX is fast approaching. Submissions must be received by 21 November. Please see below for the CFP, which includes more information on this year’s conference planned events and activities.

Call for Papers: Britain and the World Conference 2017

Place: Austin, Texas

Dates: April 6-8, 2017

Deadline for submissions:  Monday, 21 November 2016

Decisions on inclusion:  Monday, 5 December 2016

After London in June 2016, Britain and the World returns to Austin for 2017 and our tenth anniversary conference. As in 2015, the conference venue and hotel will be the Doubletree University Area, which is a five minute walk from the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. As ever, the conference is concerned with interactions within the ‘British world’ from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present and will highlight the importance of transnational perspectives.

The Keynote Speaker will be Professor Carla Pestana of UCLA, and two other three plenary speakers will be confirmed. There will be lunchtime roundtables on Brexit and on public history.

The conference accepts both individual twenty-minute papers and complete panel submissions. Panels are expected to consist of three papers and should be submitted by one person who is willing to serve as the point of contact. Complete panels must also include a chair. In addition to abstracts for each individual paper, panel submissions should also include a brief 100-150 word introduction describing the panel’s main theme. The conference does not discriminate between panels and individual paper submissions, nor between graduate students and established academics.

As ever the conference icebreaker will be held on the first evening, the Dinner Party on the second, and the outings in downtown Austin on the third. These events will provide numerous opportunities for networking and more in and around the live music capital of the world.

All submissions for inclusion in the conference must be received by Monday, 21 November 2016, with decisions on inclusion announced on Monday, 5 December 2016. Submissions should be made by email to editoratbritishscholardotorg  (editoratbritishscholardotorg)  . Please submit all information in the body of your email (no attachments or PDFs, thank you) and in the following order: name, affiliation, email, paper title, abstract, keywords.

Updates regarding the conference will periodically be posted on the Society website. It is hoped that participants will be able to call upon their departments for hotel and transportation expenses as the conference is not able to offer financial support.

On Twitter the hashtag is #BATW2017. Registration for the Conference will open on 9 January 2017. If you have any questions about the forthcoming conference, please contact the Conference Organizing Committee directly at conferenceatbritishscholardotorg  (conferenceatbritishscholardotorg)  .

Best wishes,

Michelle Brock

Martin Farr

Conference Organizing Committee 2017

For more information, go to the following link:

http://britishscholar.org/conference-2017/

II. Dinner Party Location for 2017 Britain and the World Conference

We are excited to announce that the Dinner Party for the Tenth Annual Britain and the World Conference will take place at the beautiful Oasis Restaurant on stunning Lake Travis!  The Dinner Party will occur on Friday, April 7, 2017 and buses will be provided to and from the restaurant. For details on the restaurant site, including pictures, please visit the following link:

http://oasis-austin.com

III. Call for Contributors: New Blog on Teaching Britain and the World

The British Scholar Society is pleased to announce a new venture, a blog on Teaching Britain and the World. This serves as a call for authors who would like to contribute to this blog with a post that is no longer than 1000 words. As historians, most of us are not only researchers, but also academic teachers, and we are keen to foster the dialogue about your different experiences, plans and projects in the university classroom. The (by no means exclusive) list of possible subjects includes teaching methods, the challenge of balancing research and teaching obligations, the construction of syllabi, the use of primary sources, the impact of current affairs and public debates on classroom discussions, language barriers, and much more. In order to make this as broad a discussion as possible, we are keen to include colleagues at every level of their career, who study any period from the seventeenth century to the present, teach at a variety of academic institutions, and come from both Anglophone and non-Anglophone backgrounds. We are also keen to include student perspectives. The only requirement is that the blog entry has to focus on the specific challenges of teaching the history of Britain and the World. If you have an idea for a blog entry, please get in touch with Dr Helene von Bismarck at helenedotvondotbismarckatbritishscholardotorg  (helenedotvondotbismarckatbritishscholardotorg)  .

IV. New Web Admin/Master Needed for British Scholar Society Website

The British Scholar Society has need of a new webmaster for its website. We are particularly interested in securing the help of someone who has extensive and demonstrated experience in web design, especially as relates to building and maintaining websites from the ground up. Anyone serving in this capacity would be accorded an Associate Editor position in the Society for their term as webmaster. Those interested should email the Director of Communications & Social Media, Dr Leslie Rogne Schumacher, at lschumacatsjudotedu  (lschumacatsjudotedu)   for more information.

V. Location Announced for 2018 Britain and the World Conference

We now are able to announce the location for the 2018 Britain and the World Conference, which will return to the United Kingdom for its eleventh annual meeting and its fourth in the UK. 2018’s conference will take place at the University of Exeter, in relationship with the Centre for Imperial and Global History. We are very pleased to be working with Exeter’s Dr Marc-William Palen and others in making the preliminary arrangements for what promises to be a fantastic event.

VI. Call for Submissions to Britain and the World Journal and Book Series

The British Scholar Society would like to take this opportunity to invite our Newsletter subscribers to consider submitting their research to our journal, Britain and the World: Historical Journal of The British Scholar Society, and our ‘Britain and the World’ book series. Our journal, which is included in the Thomson Reuters Social Sciences Citation Index, is edited by Prof John M. MacKenzie and published biannually by Edinburgh University Press. Our book series is edited by Dr Martin Farr and published by Palgrave Macmillan. More information on our journal and our book series, including instructions for those interested in submitting their work, can be found at the following links:

http://www.euppublishing.com/loi/brw

http://www.palgrave.com/gp/series/14795

VII. Call for Contributors to National Archives Blog

The National Archives (TNA) has communicated to us a blog feature called ‘Connecting collections: tell us your research story’. Please take a moment to read their press release below and consider contributing.

‘The National Archives, working with members of the archives sector, is calling for blog entries from academic researchers which explore the connections between archives across the UK and around the world.

‘Archival research can lead you to surprising locations – and conclusions. Have you consulted a record in one archive whose value only became clear when contextualised with a record held elsewhere? Tracked down a document and found yourself as intrigued by its location as its content? Or aimed to link collections together? We’d like to hear about your eureka moments, but also the hard work of research, with days with little to show.

‘For this series, we’re as interested in your methodology and experience of archival research as we are in what you’re studying. We hope your story will both enrich people’s understanding of the possible connections between archives, and encourage researchers to be adventurous when planning their own journeys.

‘Better research expands the world for us all.

‘For further information and to submit a blog post, please visit: http://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/connecting-collections-tell-us-research-story/

Deadline for submissions: 5th December 2016

VIII. Information on Liverpool Centre for Port and Maritime History

In keeping with our interest in forging ties between our organization and others with overlapping areas of focus, we would like to draw our readers’ attention to the Liverpool Centre for Port and Maritime History (CPMH).

As communicated to us by the CPMH’s Acting Director, Dr Simon Hill, the centre ‘covers global maritime and port history broadly considered, extending from the medieval period to the modern era. Amongst the various topics that we have considered are: ports and the environment, lawlessness at sea, early modern British privateers operating in Swedish waters, Malaysian sailors in Liverpool, international shipping during the 1970s, the cultural experience of sailing on trans-Atlantic liners, and so many more topics besides’.

For more information on the CPMH, please contact SdotJdotHill1atljmudotacdotuk  (SdotJdotHill1atljmudotacdotuk)   or visit the following link:

https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/management/research/history-society-and-institutions/centre-for-port-and-maritime/about/

IX. Event: ‘Outlaws by Shore and Sea’

The International Postgraduate Port and Maritime Studies Network (IPPMSN) will hold an event at the Tate Liverpool on 8 December on the topic of ‘Outlaws by Shore and Sea’. Tickets are free, but must be arranged online. Please visit the following link for more information:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/outlaws-by-shore-and-sea-tickets-28856107394

X. New Post for Society Vice-Chair

The British Scholar Society’s Vice-Chair and Director of Communications & Social Media, Dr Leslie Rogne Schumacher, has been named the 2016-2017 David H. Burton Fellow at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, PA. In addition to a teaching and research appointment as a Visiting Assistant Professor, Burton Fellows run a departmental pedagogy workshop and deliver a yearly public lecture. More information on Dr Schumacher’s projects and initiatives while serving as the Burton Fellow can be found at the following link:

https://www.sju.edu/about-sju/faculty-staff/leslie-rogne-schumacher-phd

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Dinner Party for Britain and the World 2017 to be held at The Oasis!

Dinner Party to be held at The Oasis on Lake Travis!

The Dinner Party for the Tenth Annual Britain and the World Conference will take place at the beautiful Oasis Restaurant on stunning Lake Travis!  The Dinner Party will occur on Friday, April 7, 2017 and buses will be provided to and from the restaurant.  Here is a picture to whet your appetite!

oasis-1

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2017 Britain and the World Call for Papers

DEADLINE EXTENDED:  Monday, 12 December 2016

The official Call For Papers for the 2017 Britain and the World Conference is now available:

 

Call for Papers: Britain and the World Conference 2017

Place: Austin, Texas

Dates: April 6-8, 2017

Deadline for submissions (extended):  Monday, 12 December 2016

Decisions on inclusion:  Monday, 19 December 2016

After London in June 2016, Britain and the World returns to Austin for 2017 and our tenth anniversary conference. As in 2015, the conference venue and hotel will be the Doubletree University Area, which is a five minute walk from the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. As ever, the conference is concerned with interactions within the ‘British world’ from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present and will highlight the importance of transnational perspectives.

The Keynote Speaker will be Professor Carla Pestana of UCLA, and two other plenary speakers will be confirmed. There will be lunchtime roundtables on Brexit and on public history.

The conference accepts both individual twenty-minute papers and complete panel submissions. Panels are expected to consist of three papers and should be submitted by one person who is willing to serve as the point of contact. Complete panels must also include a chair. In addition to abstracts for each individual paper, panel submissions should also include a brief 100-150 word introduction describing the panel’s main theme. The conference does not discriminate between panels and individual paper submissions, nor between graduate students and established academics.

As ever the conference icebreaker will be held on the first evening, the Dinner Party on the second, and the outings in downtown Austin on the third. These events will provide numerous opportunities for networking and more in and around the live music capital of the world.

All submissions for inclusion in the conference must be received by Monday, 21 November 2016, with decisions on inclusion announced on Monday, 5 December 2016. Submissions should be made by email to editoratbritishscholardotorg  (editoratbritishscholardotorg)  . Please submit all information in the body of your email (no attachments or PDFs, thank you) and in the following order: name, affiliation, email, paper title, abstract, keywords.

Updates regarding the conference will periodically be posted on the Society website. It is hoped that participants will be able to call upon their departments for hotel and transportation expenses as the conference is not able to offer financial support.

On Twitter the hashtag is #BATW2017. Registration for the Conference will open on 9 January 2017. If you have any questions about the forthcoming conference, please contact the Conference Organizing Committee directly at conferenceatbritishscholardotorg  (conferenceatbritishscholardotorg)  .

Best wishes,
Michelle Brock
Martin Farr
Bryan Glass
Conference Organizing Committee 2017

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Updates on 2016 Conference

We are pleased to announce that the final conference programme for the 2016 Britain and the World Conference, to be held 22-4 June at King’s College London, is now available. Click the following link to see details on the conference’s 60+ panels, 200+ speakers, as well as the plenary lectures and conference social events.

http://britishscholar.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/BATW2016-PROGRAMME_Final.pdf

Also, at this time we would like to remind our readers that conference attendees must sign up and purchase a pass to attend the annual conference dinner party. The conference dinner will be a buffet with wine and full bar service on board the Golden Flame, which will depart from just outside the conference venue at Temple Pier at 7 pm prompt, cruise along the Thames, returning and docking at 10.30 pm. Guests will be able to stay on board until midnight. Price includes meal and ½ bottle of wine or equivalent per person.

To sign up, go to the conference webpage and follow the instructions provided there:

http://britishscholar.org/conference-2016/

 

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