Sign up for Our Newsletter

Autumn 2016 Newsletter

I. Deadline Approaching: Call for Papers for 2017 Britain and the World Conference

The deadline for submitting abstracts for the 2017 Britain and the World Conference in Austin, TX is fast approaching. Submissions must be received by 21 November. Please see below for the CFP, which includes more information on this year’s conference planned events and activities.

Call for Papers: Britain and the World Conference 2017

Place: Austin, Texas

Dates: April 6-8, 2017

Deadline for submissions:  Monday, 21 November 2016

Decisions on inclusion:  Monday, 5 December 2016

After London in June 2016, Britain and the World returns to Austin for 2017 and our tenth anniversary conference. As in 2015, the conference venue and hotel will be the Doubletree University Area, which is a five minute walk from the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. As ever, the conference is concerned with interactions within the ‘British world’ from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present and will highlight the importance of transnational perspectives.

The Keynote Speaker will be Professor Carla Pestana of UCLA, and two other three plenary speakers will be confirmed. There will be lunchtime roundtables on Brexit and on public history.

The conference accepts both individual twenty-minute papers and complete panel submissions. Panels are expected to consist of three papers and should be submitted by one person who is willing to serve as the point of contact. Complete panels must also include a chair. In addition to abstracts for each individual paper, panel submissions should also include a brief 100-150 word introduction describing the panel’s main theme. The conference does not discriminate between panels and individual paper submissions, nor between graduate students and established academics.

As ever the conference icebreaker will be held on the first evening, the Dinner Party on the second, and the outings in downtown Austin on the third. These events will provide numerous opportunities for networking and more in and around the live music capital of the world.

All submissions for inclusion in the conference must be received by Monday, 21 November 2016, with decisions on inclusion announced on Monday, 5 December 2016. Submissions should be made by email to editoratbritishscholardotorg  (editoratbritishscholardotorg)  . Please submit all information in the body of your email (no attachments or PDFs, thank you) and in the following order: name, affiliation, email, paper title, abstract, keywords.

Updates regarding the conference will periodically be posted on the Society website. It is hoped that participants will be able to call upon their departments for hotel and transportation expenses as the conference is not able to offer financial support.

On Twitter the hashtag is #BATW2017. Registration for the Conference will open on 9 January 2017. If you have any questions about the forthcoming conference, please contact the Conference Organizing Committee directly at conferenceatbritishscholardotorg  (conferenceatbritishscholardotorg)  .

Best wishes,

Michelle Brock

Martin Farr

Conference Organizing Committee 2017

For more information, go to the following link:

http://britishscholar.org/conference-2017/

II. Dinner Party Location for 2017 Britain and the World Conference

We are excited to announce that the Dinner Party for the Tenth Annual Britain and the World Conference will take place at the beautiful Oasis Restaurant on stunning Lake Travis!  The Dinner Party will occur on Friday, April 7, 2017 and buses will be provided to and from the restaurant. For details on the restaurant site, including pictures, please visit the following link:

http://oasis-austin.com

III. Call for Contributors: New Blog on Teaching Britain and the World

The British Scholar Society is pleased to announce a new venture, a blog on Teaching Britain and the World. This serves as a call for authors who would like to contribute to this blog with a post that is no longer than 1000 words. As historians, most of us are not only researchers, but also academic teachers, and we are keen to foster the dialogue about your different experiences, plans and projects in the university classroom. The (by no means exclusive) list of possible subjects includes teaching methods, the challenge of balancing research and teaching obligations, the construction of syllabi, the use of primary sources, the impact of current affairs and public debates on classroom discussions, language barriers, and much more. In order to make this as broad a discussion as possible, we are keen to include colleagues at every level of their career, who study any period from the seventeenth century to the present, teach at a variety of academic institutions, and come from both Anglophone and non-Anglophone backgrounds. We are also keen to include student perspectives. The only requirement is that the blog entry has to focus on the specific challenges of teaching the history of Britain and the World. If you have an idea for a blog entry, please get in touch with Dr Helene von Bismarck at helenedotvondotbismarckatbritishscholardotorg  (helenedotvondotbismarckatbritishscholardotorg)  .

IV. New Web Admin/Master Needed for British Scholar Society Website

The British Scholar Society has need of a new webmaster for its website. We are particularly interested in securing the help of someone who has extensive and demonstrated experience in web design, especially as relates to building and maintaining websites from the ground up. Anyone serving in this capacity would be accorded an Associate Editor position in the Society for their term as webmaster. Those interested should email the Director of Communications & Social Media, Dr Leslie Rogne Schumacher, at lschumacatsjudotedu  (lschumacatsjudotedu)   for more information.

V. Location Announced for 2018 Britain and the World Conference

We now are able to announce the location for the 2018 Britain and the World Conference, which will return to the United Kingdom for its eleventh annual meeting and its fourth in the UK. 2018’s conference will take place at the University of Exeter, in relationship with the Centre for Imperial and Global History. We are very pleased to be working with Exeter’s Dr Marc-William Palen and others in making the preliminary arrangements for what promises to be a fantastic event.

VI. Call for Submissions to Britain and the World Journal and Book Series

The British Scholar Society would like to take this opportunity to invite our Newsletter subscribers to consider submitting their research to our journal, Britain and the World: Historical Journal of The British Scholar Society, and our ‘Britain and the World’ book series. Our journal, which is included in the Thomson Reuters Social Sciences Citation Index, is edited by Prof John M. MacKenzie and published biannually by Edinburgh University Press. Our book series is edited by Dr Martin Farr and published by Palgrave Macmillan. More information on our journal and our book series, including instructions for those interested in submitting their work, can be found at the following links:

http://www.euppublishing.com/loi/brw

http://www.palgrave.com/gp/series/14795

VII. Call for Contributors to National Archives Blog

The National Archives (TNA) has communicated to us a blog feature called ‘Connecting collections: tell us your research story’. Please take a moment to read their press release below and consider contributing.

‘The National Archives, working with members of the archives sector, is calling for blog entries from academic researchers which explore the connections between archives across the UK and around the world.

‘Archival research can lead you to surprising locations – and conclusions. Have you consulted a record in one archive whose value only became clear when contextualised with a record held elsewhere? Tracked down a document and found yourself as intrigued by its location as its content? Or aimed to link collections together? We’d like to hear about your eureka moments, but also the hard work of research, with days with little to show.

‘For this series, we’re as interested in your methodology and experience of archival research as we are in what you’re studying. We hope your story will both enrich people’s understanding of the possible connections between archives, and encourage researchers to be adventurous when planning their own journeys.

‘Better research expands the world for us all.

‘For further information and to submit a blog post, please visit: http://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/connecting-collections-tell-us-research-story/

Deadline for submissions: 5th December 2016

VIII. Information on Liverpool Centre for Port and Maritime History

In keeping with our interest in forging ties between our organization and others with overlapping areas of focus, we would like to draw our readers’ attention to the Liverpool Centre for Port and Maritime History (CPMH).

As communicated to us by the CPMH’s Acting Director, Dr Simon Hill, the centre ‘covers global maritime and port history broadly considered, extending from the medieval period to the modern era. Amongst the various topics that we have considered are: ports and the environment, lawlessness at sea, early modern British privateers operating in Swedish waters, Malaysian sailors in Liverpool, international shipping during the 1970s, the cultural experience of sailing on trans-Atlantic liners, and so many more topics besides’.

For more information on the CPMH, please contact SdotJdotHill1atljmudotacdotuk  (SdotJdotHill1atljmudotacdotuk)   or visit the following link:

https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/management/research/history-society-and-institutions/centre-for-port-and-maritime/about/

IX. Event: ‘Outlaws by Shore and Sea’

The International Postgraduate Port and Maritime Studies Network (IPPMSN) will hold an event at the Tate Liverpool on 8 December on the topic of ‘Outlaws by Shore and Sea’. Tickets are free, but must be arranged online. Please visit the following link for more information:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/outlaws-by-shore-and-sea-tickets-28856107394

X. New Post for Society Vice-Chair

The British Scholar Society’s Vice-Chair and Director of Communications & Social Media, Dr Leslie Rogne Schumacher, has been named the 2016-2017 David H. Burton Fellow at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, PA. In addition to a teaching and research appointment as a Visiting Assistant Professor, Burton Fellows run a departmental pedagogy workshop and deliver a yearly public lecture. More information on Dr Schumacher’s projects and initiatives while serving as the Burton Fellow can be found at the following link:

https://www.sju.edu/about-sju/faculty-staff/leslie-rogne-schumacher-phd

Posted in News, Newsletter | Comments closed

Dinner Party for Britain and the World 2017 to be held at The Oasis!

Dinner Party to be held at The Oasis on Lake Travis!

The Dinner Party for the Tenth Annual Britain and the World Conference will take place at the beautiful Oasis Restaurant on stunning Lake Travis!  The Dinner Party will occur on Friday, April 7, 2017 and buses will be provided to and from the restaurant.  Here is a picture to whet your appetite!

oasis-1

Posted in News | Comments closed

2017 Britain and the World Call for Papers

DEADLINE EXTENDED:  Monday, 12 December 2016

The official Call For Papers for the 2017 Britain and the World Conference is now available:

 

Call for Papers: Britain and the World Conference 2017

Place: Austin, Texas

Dates: April 6-8, 2017

Deadline for submissions (extended):  Monday, 12 December 2016

Decisions on inclusion:  Monday, 19 December 2016

After London in June 2016, Britain and the World returns to Austin for 2017 and our tenth anniversary conference. As in 2015, the conference venue and hotel will be the Doubletree University Area, which is a five minute walk from the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. As ever, the conference is concerned with interactions within the ‘British world’ from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present and will highlight the importance of transnational perspectives.

The Keynote Speaker will be Professor Carla Pestana of UCLA, and two other plenary speakers will be confirmed. There will be lunchtime roundtables on Brexit and on public history.

The conference accepts both individual twenty-minute papers and complete panel submissions. Panels are expected to consist of three papers and should be submitted by one person who is willing to serve as the point of contact. Complete panels must also include a chair. In addition to abstracts for each individual paper, panel submissions should also include a brief 100-150 word introduction describing the panel’s main theme. The conference does not discriminate between panels and individual paper submissions, nor between graduate students and established academics.

As ever the conference icebreaker will be held on the first evening, the Dinner Party on the second, and the outings in downtown Austin on the third. These events will provide numerous opportunities for networking and more in and around the live music capital of the world.

All submissions for inclusion in the conference must be received by Monday, 21 November 2016, with decisions on inclusion announced on Monday, 5 December 2016. Submissions should be made by email to editoratbritishscholardotorg  (editoratbritishscholardotorg)  . Please submit all information in the body of your email (no attachments or PDFs, thank you) and in the following order: name, affiliation, email, paper title, abstract, keywords.

Updates regarding the conference will periodically be posted on the Society website. It is hoped that participants will be able to call upon their departments for hotel and transportation expenses as the conference is not able to offer financial support.

On Twitter the hashtag is #BATW2017. Registration for the Conference will open on 9 January 2017. If you have any questions about the forthcoming conference, please contact the Conference Organizing Committee directly at conferenceatbritishscholardotorg  (conferenceatbritishscholardotorg)  .

Best wishes,
Michelle Brock
Martin Farr
Bryan Glass
Conference Organizing Committee 2017

Posted in News | Comments closed

Updates on 2016 Conference

We are pleased to announce that the final conference programme for the 2016 Britain and the World Conference, to be held 22-4 June at King’s College London, is now available. Click the following link to see details on the conference’s 60+ panels, 200+ speakers, as well as the plenary lectures and conference social events.

http://britishscholar.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/BATW2016-PROGRAMME_Final.pdf

Also, at this time we would like to remind our readers that conference attendees must sign up and purchase a pass to attend the annual conference dinner party. The conference dinner will be a buffet with wine and full bar service on board the Golden Flame, which will depart from just outside the conference venue at Temple Pier at 7 pm prompt, cruise along the Thames, returning and docking at 10.30 pm. Guests will be able to stay on board until midnight. Price includes meal and ½ bottle of wine or equivalent per person.

To sign up, go to the conference webpage and follow the instructions provided there:

http://britishscholar.org/conference-2016/

 

Posted in News | Comments closed

2016 Conference Programme Available!

We are pleased to announce that the 2016 Britain and the World Conference programme is now available. Please click on the link below to download a PDF of the programme:

http://britishscholar.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/BATW2016-PROGRAMME.pdf

For more information on this year’s conference, held at King’s College London on 22-4 June, visit the following link:

http://britishscholar.org/conference-2016/

Posted in News | Comments closed

May 2016 Newsletter

I. Reminder: Register for 2016 Britain and the World Conference

Our annual conference (22-24 June at King’s College London) is fast approaching, and at this time we would like to remind our newsletter readers who plan on attending the conference to register. To register for the conference, please visit Kings College London’s e-store at the following address:

http://estore.kcl.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=13&catid=137&prodid=632

Our registration rates are as follows:

Members: faculty £150, students £100

Non-members: faculty £200, students £150

The rates are for all three days of the conference, and include refreshments (coffee, tea, water) throughout the day, lunch every day, and wine reception on the first day (The conference dinner will be separate, and conference-goers will receive separate communications on it from the conference committee).

Not only because it is almost entirely defrayed in registration fees, we very much encourage you to become members of the society, which additionally means you will receive a subscription to our journal, Britain and the World, which will be posted to you and you also gain web access to the archive. The journal is published biannually, but is soon slated to move to a triannual format. If you would like to become a member of the British Scholar Society ($59) to take advantage of the discounted rate, please register before the conference by going to: http://britishscholar.org/british-scholar/membership/

Please continue to check the conference website for developments and updates:

http://britishscholar.org/conference-2016/

II. Reminder: 2016 Britain and the World Accommodation Information

We would also like to remind our newsletter readers of the accommodation arrangements that we have made in anticipation of the rooming needs of our conference attendees.

We have secured 100 rooms at the Royal National Hotel, Bedford Way, WC1H 0DG, just off Russell Square. The conference venue is 20 minutes’ walk (down Southampton Row/Kingsway), or 10 minutes’ on a constant stream of buses (numbers 68, 59, 91, 168, and 188) which is much quicker than the tube.  There are many other even closer hotels, although they are much more expensive.

Royal National rates are £98 for a single room and £123 for a twin room if booked by phone, £88 for a single room and £113 for a twin room if booked online: https://www.imperialhotels.co.uk/en/royal-national. Guests can also take advantage of their online BOGO Offer – complimentary dinner on the night of arrival for bookings of 2 or more consecutive nights. Early booking is advised, and any remaining rooms will be released on 28 May.

Additionally we have also arranged rooms from the LSE at their Bankside House, also 20 minutes’ walk, over the river. Prices for Bed and Breakfast per night: single room with shared bathroom £59; 2 single en-suite connecting rooms, £98, triple room en suite, £131, and quad room en suite, £147. Please visit  www.lsevacations.co.uk  or call (+44) 02079557676.

III. General Editor in History & Policy

Our General Editor, Dr. Martin Farr, has published an opinion piece in History & Policy on the historical background and context of the Strategic Defence and Security Review. His insightful comments are essential reading with regard to illuminating how the current system of defence reviews in the UK came into being, as well as the reasons behind SDSR’s irregular schedule and the consequences of the SDSR’s harnessing to broader domestic political agendas.

Please go to the following link to read Dr. Farr’s interesting article:

http://www.historyandpolicy.org/opinion-articles/articles/defence-reviews-strategic-and-otherwise

IV. Deputy General Editor’s New Book

We are very pleased to announce the release of a new monograph by our Deputy General Editor, Dr. Michelle Brock. Her book, Satan and the Scots: The Devil in Post-Reformation Scotland, c. 1560–1700, is the latest volume in the long-running St Andrews Studies in Reformation History series. In investigating the connections between sin, the concept of the Devil, and early modern Scottish society and politics, Dr. Brock argues that “post-Reformation beliefs about the Devil profoundly influenced the experiences and identities of the Scottish people through the creation of a shared cultural conversation about evil and human nature.”

For more information on Dr. Brock’s exciting contribution to the field, please go to the following link:

http://www.routledge.com/Satan-and-the-Scots-The-Devil-in-Post-Reformation-Scotland-c1560-1700/Brock/p/book/9781472470010

V. Journal on Malaysian and Southeast Asian History

In keeping with The British Scholar Society’s goal of connecting scholars across our field’s many (and often arbitrary) regional divisions and disciplinary divides, we would like draw our readers’ attention to the journal Sejarah, which is published by the Department of History at the University of Malaya. Sejarah‘s focus is on Malaysian history, and also accepts contributions on topics related to other Southeast Asian societies and the region in general. The journal has recently transitioned to a fully online format, which can be accessed at the following link:

http://e-journal.um.edu.my/publish/SEJARAH/Aabout

VI. National Centre of Biography (AUS) Conference

This summer, Australia’s National Centre of Biography will host an international conference titled “True Biographies of Nations? Exploring the Cultural Journeys of Dictionaries of National Biography.” The conference will meet from 30 June to 2 July at Australian National University in Acton and the National Library of Australia at Parkes Place in Canberra. Those interested in attending may read more details on the conference, register for the event, and read the draft programme by visiting the following link:

http://ncb.anu.edu.au/biographies-of-nations

VII. Free Conference on “Embassies in Crisis”

On 9 June, the British Academy (10-11 Carlton House Terrace, London) will host a one-day conference on the topic of “Embassies in Crisis,” and will focus on the testimonies and perspectives of serving and former Embassy staff. The conference, organised by the Universities of Exeter and Strathclyde in conjunction with the FCO Historians and the British International History Group, is a free event but one must register beforehand to take part. To read more about the conference and to register, go to the following link:

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/embassies-in-crisis-conference-at-the-british-academy-tickets-24897481036

VIII. Book of the Month

May 2016: Black Market Britain, 1939-1955

Reviewed by Adrian Smith, University of Southampton

Posted in News, Newsletter | Comments closed

May 2016: Black Market Britain, 1939-1955

Mark Roodhouse. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. 288 pp. £65 (hardcover).

Reviewed by: Adrian Smith, University of Southampton

Five years ago I asked the campus cafe´ to provide a civilian’s rations for a week c. 1941, and to cook a Ministry of Food recipe. My students stared in astonishment at the mountain of sugar, asking how one individual could consume so much. They then swiftly polished off a Woolton Pie, declaring it a first class vegetarian dish. I soon sensed a fresh scepticism re the austere nature of life on the Home Front. More recently my Catholic mother mentioned a bookie’s runner taking bets from her blitzed office in wartime Coventry: here was someone whose moral code dictated that she turn up for work on the morning of 15 November 1940 (not surprisingly an astonished fireman sent her straight home); and yet she saw nothing wrong in a weekly flutter on the horses. Neither, incidentally, did it cross her mind that taking a bottle of whiskey through the customs at Holyhead constituted a serious transgression. Both anecdotes demonstrate how with the passage of time dominant tropes and widely shared assumptions can so easily be subverted, such that no aspect of the British war effort can be taken for granted. The popularity of the Woolton Pie and the distaste for an abundance of sugar illustrate changing diet, and confirm the central argument of David Kynaston in Austerity Britain that, for all the superficial familiarity of life seventy years ago, society really has changed quite significantly. Yet, ironically, although critics of secularism and prevailing social mores berate relative morality as a post-1960s phenomenon, examples such as my mother’s relaxed view of legal constraint challenge our notion of mid-century Britain as a conscience-driven, uniquely lawabiding nation.

This elementary point lies at the heart of Mark Roodhouse’s dense study of how the British people coped with being denied the little things that made life worth living across the course of the 1940s. Rationing continued into an era of rising affluence and aspiration, but an accelerated easing of controls late in the decade meant a diminishing return upon related criminal behaviour. Organised
crime, from the pooling of dockside pilfering through to gangland hijacking of fuel tankers, constituted the most damaging element of the black market, but not the most high profile. Then and now the black market is synonymous with the ‘spiv’, or the ‘wide boy’, with his pencil-thin moustache, zoot suit, and multipocketed trench coat. Here is an image which, courtesy of popular culture (not least Ealing comedies and Dad’s Army), remains as rooted in the national psyche as the phrase ‘fell off the back of a lorry’. The ubiquitous nature of black market parlance suggests that everyone was seeking to ‘wangle’ some ‘dodgy’ goods. Yet as Roodhouse makes clear, most people’s acquaintance with illegal trading was not via a street corner spiv. Attitudes towards spivs were ambivalent, so that in the cinema they could be portrayed as lovable rogues whereas in big cities they were the focus of anti-semitic attacks. Most spivs were gentiles, but the prominence of the Jewish community at every level of retailing, and within the clothing industry, encouraged a malign myth that Jews were reaping disproportionate rewards from black-market trading.

Spivs were essentially an urban phenomenon. Their disproportionate significance as the most resilient symbol of the black market signals Roodhouse’s contention that, for most of the adult population, moral relativism 1940s-style was displayed via the ‘grey market’. His book could accurately be called Fifty Shades of Grey had not another study of pain and desire previously claimed the title. For most people evasion of rationing controls entailed the misuse of coupons or the purchase of goods from ‘under the counter’ when dealing with local traders. It was small-scale law-breaking, and very few could claim never to have flaunted the regulations. The authorities secured a remarkable level of consensus by justifying a bafflingly complex system of rationing on the basis of ‘fairness’ rather than patriotic exhortation; while both collective and individual behaviour was moulded by a populist concept of ‘fairness’. Needless to say respective understandings of what was ‘fair’ often clashed, but Roodhouse illustrates how the local constabulary, many magistrates, and even some judges, often turned a blind eye to what was technically illegal because the letter of the law flew in the face of what the community deemed to be demonstrably ‘right’. The police, busy fighting wartime crime but nevertheless enjoying an unprecedented level of popularity, resented a Whitehall requirement to work closely with inspectors who were largely indifferent to local circumstance. ‘Fairness’ was of course dictated by circumstance, both immediate and external; so, for example, someone receiving illicit petrol in 1946 would not have done so a year earlier out of respect for seamen risking their lives to supply Britain with fuel. Indifference to official controls grew in proportion to a shared sense that they were no longer necessary, or, if introduced belatedly like bread rationing, were wholly unwarranted. Efforts to clamp down on both black and grey markets became that much harder the more extended the passage of time since the war. In consequence Attlee’s Labour government attracted more frequent accusations of heavy-handed behaviour than had Churchill’s wartime coalition.

Black Market Britain is based upon Mark Roodhouse’s doctoral thesis, and bears all the hall marks of sustained and intensive intellectual inquiry. This review scarcely touches upon the myriad of topics covered. The monograph is such a pioneering and wide-ranging historical and sociological survey that it is hard
to imagine any future investigation surpassing it – this surely is the nearest thing to a definitive statement. Ironically, precisely because it endeavours to cover so much, Black Market Britain is no easy read. In an ideal world it would provide a rich seam of material for Dr Roodhouse to draw upon when producing a lighter and more entertaining volume for a wider audience. Given OUP’s pricing
policy no doubt the author would make a second book available only to loyal readers and at a knock-down price, assuming of course that we asked nicely and told no-one.

Posted in Book of the Month, News | Comments closed

March 2016 Newsletter

I. Update on 2016 Britain and the World Conference: Venue and Date Change

The British Scholar Society would like to inform its newsletter readers that it has been found necessary to make a venue change for the 2016 Britain and the World Conference. Instead of Senate House at the University of London, the conference will now be held at King’s College London. The movement of our meeting place has necessitated a slight change in dates as well. The conference will now run from 22 to 24 June. All other aspects of the conference remain the same. This promises to be our biggest and most successful conference yet, and we are very excited about the better prospects for scholarly and social interaction that our movement to KCL promises.

Please continue to check the conference website for developments and updates:

http://britishscholar.org/conference-2016/

II. 2016 Britain and the World Accommodation Information Available

In anticipation of the rooming needs for participants in the 2016 Britain and the World Conference, we are pleased to announce that we have secured 100 rooms at the Royal National Hotel, Bedford Way, WC1H 0DG, just off Russell Square. The conference venue is 20 minutes’ walk (down Southampton Row/Kingsway), or 10 minutes’ on a constant stream of buses (numbers 68, 59, 91, 168, and 188) which is much quicker than the tube.  There are many other even closer hotels, although they are much more expensive.

Royal National rates are £98 for a single room and £123 for a twin room if booked by phone, £88 for a single room and £113 for a twin room if booked online: https://www.imperialhotels.co.uk/en/royal-national. Guests can also take advantage of their online BOGO Offer – complimentary dinner on the night of arrival for bookings of 2 or more consecutive nights. Early booking is advised, and any remaining rooms will be released on 28 May.

Additionally we have also arranged rooms from the LSE at their Bankside House, also 20 minutes’ walk, over the river. Prices for Bed and Breakfast per night: single room with shared bathroom £59; 2 single en-suite connecting rooms, £98, triple room en suite, £131, and quad room en suite, £147. Please visit  www.lsevacations.co.uk  or call (+44) 02079557676.

For more information, please visit the conference website:

http://britishscholar.org/conference-2016/

III. New Issue of Britain and the World Journal Now Out

The March 2016 issue of Britain and the World: Historical Journal of The British Scholar Society has now been published and is available in print and to view online. This is the first issue edited by our new Editor-in-Chief, Professor John M. MacKenzie, under whose guidance Britain and the World will, we have no doubt, further cement its key role in providing innovative insights into the history of Britain and its global interactions.

Please go to the following link to access the newest edition of the journal, as well as previous issues:

http://www.euppublishing.com/journal/brw

IV. Britain and the World Journal Now in ERIH PLUS Index

Another piece of good news related to the journal is that Britain and the World was recently accepted for inclusion in European Reference Index for the Humanities and Social Sciences (ERIH PLUS), which is highly respected for its initiatives to bring global attention to high quality humanities and social sciences research.

Interested parties can visit Britain and the World‘s listing on the ERIH PLUS website, where one can also find more information on the index more generally:

https://dbh.nsd.uib.no/publiseringskanaler/erihplus/periodical/info?id=484974

V. Society Director of Outreach on Thatcher, Delors, and European Integration

Society Director of Outreach Dr. Helene von Bismarck will be giving a talk shortly for the Contemporary British History Seminar (CBHS) at King College London’s Strand campus. Those interested can watch Dr. von Bismarck speak on 9 March on the topic of “Margaret Thatcher, Jacques Delors and the Relaunch of European Integration in the mid-1980s.”

For more information, please visit the following link:

http://www.history.ac.uk/events/seminars/105

VI. Society General Editor in the Media

Following Jeremy Corbyn’s stunning victory in the Labour Party leadership elections, Society General Editor Dr. Martin Farr has been called on to provide his understanding of this important event in the context of post-1945 British politics. Recently, Dr. Farr offered his assessment of the conditions that have allowed Corbyn and Bernie Sanders, a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2016 US presidential elections, to succeed in making a radical impact even though previous firebrands have failed.

Read Dr. Farr’s interesting and important thoughts at the following link:

http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/jeremy-corbyn-bernie-sanders-putting-10848741

VII. CFP: Conference on Postwar British-French Relationship

The University of Strathclyde and the Institute of Historical Research have issued a Call for Papers for a conference titled: “Relations between Britain and France at the End of World War Two: Cooperation and Reconstruction.” They invite proposals for 20 minute papers on any aspect of the workshop theme. Please send paper proposals with an abstract of 250-300 words and one-page CV to Dr Karine Varley at KarinedotVarleyatstrathdotacdotuk  (KarinedotVarleyatstrathdotacdotuk)   by 18 March 2016.

For more information on the conference, go to the following link:

http://events.history.ac.uk/event/show/15030

VIII. Book of the Month

October 2015: Western Maternity and Medicine, 1880-1990

Reviewed by Jane Adams, University of Otago

Posted in News, Newsletter | Comments closed

March 2016: Western Maternity and Medicine, 1880–1990

Janet Greenlees and Linda Bryder, (eds). London: Pickering & Chatto, 2013. xiii, 214 pp. £60.00 (hardcover).

Reviewed by: Jane Adams, University of Otago

The late nineteenth and twentieth centuries constituted a hugely important period in the development of maternity services, policies and science in the Western world, Janet Greenlees and Linda Bryder argue in their introductory essay to Western Maternity and Medicine, 1880–1990. Of particular significance from the woman’s perspective was the dramatic shift in the location of childbirth (from the home to the hospital) as well as a steep decline in maternal mortality rates from the 1930s and later in perinatal mortality, and increased public and political attention upon the health of pregnant mothers and their newborn babies.

These historical developments have already received significant scholarly attention (as Greenlees and Bryder acknowledge), particularly as a result of
developments in social history and feminist politics from the late 1970s. As a result of these ideological shifts, they argue that the dominant interpretation of
childbirth history that has emerged has been one of progressive male domination and the corresponding oppression or disempowerment of women (Ann Oakley’s
influential 1984 work The Captured Womb is given as a key example of this ideological trend). But Greenlees and Bryder argue that the actual historical
records convey a far more nuanced story than this dominant historiographical approach might suggest and instead, women have sometimes had far greater
agency into their maternity experiences (an argument developed by the likes of Canadian scholar Wendy Mitchinson, for example).

Accordingly, Greenlees, Bryder and the other contributors to this multiauthored collection of essays aim to focus their readers’ attention upon the mothers’ agency in their interactions with other stakeholders in maternity services, including physicians, midwives, governments and the voluntary sector. They seek to achieve this by adopting a case study approach, drawing upon a rich variety of historical records in their respective studies. These sources include the medical casebooks of particular institutions (Janet Greenlees, for example, uses them in her essay on the Church of Scotland’s home for unmarried mothers, as does Allison Nuttall in her essay on maternity hospitals in interwar Edinburgh and Gayle Davis in relation to an Edinburgh infertility clinic); coroners’ reports into maternal deaths (used by Madonna Grehan to examine midwifery care in the home birth setting); submissions to government inquiries (used by Gayle Davis and Linda Bryder); oral history interviews (used by Angela Davis to consider women’s childbirth experiences); and court cases (used by Allison L. Hepler to trace the development of foetal protection labour legislation).

The modern history of Scottish maternity services is particularly well represented in this volume, with four of the nine contributors (Salim Al-Gailani, Janet Greenlees, Allison Nuttall and Gayle Davis) examining various aspects of Scottish medicine and maternity services spanning the first half of the twentieth century. The other five contributors take as their focus late nineteenth-century Victoria, Australia (Madonna Grehan), New Zealand in the first half of the twentieth century (Linda Bryder), twentieth-century Ireland (Lindsey Earner- Byrne) and the United States (Allison L. Hepler) and late twentieth-century Berkshire and Oxfordshire in England (Angela Davis).

Overall, the contributors make a strong case for their focus upon maternal agency and succeed in framing their case studies within their broader historical contexts, and in particular the underlying ideological and religious concerns. Given the variety of case records and time periods that the contributors consider, it is not surprising that some essays in this volume lend themselves more naturally to capturing women’s perspectives than others. In particular, Angela Davis primarily uses oral history interviews from women recalling their childbirth experiences in relatively recent times (the 1970s and 1980s) to conclude that women were actually less critical of the medical interventions that they received in hospital (such as ultrasounds and episiotomies) than of the culture of the maternity units in which the interventions took place. In relation to the move from home to hospital births in the twentieth century, Allison Nuttall shows that the move was ultimately successful because it was driven by women’s desires (for pain relief, rest opportunities and expert medical care) rather than being medically enforced. Likewise, Linda Bryder argues in the New Zealand context that the move to hospital births succeeded due to lobbying by women’s organisations working in alliance with obstetricians.

Some contributors acknowledge and discuss the difficulties and limitations of using a ‘patient agency’ approach. Salim Al-Gailani, for example, considers Scottish obstetrician John William Ballantyne’s development of antenatal services in early twentieth-century Edinburgh and examines the underlying medico-moral ideologies underpinning the care of pregnant women. He argues that although it is essential to take pregnant women’s agency into account, their experiences can be difficult to recover from the historical record – this type of honest reflection is useful for other historians seeking to emulate a ‘patient agency’ approach.

Western Maternity and Medicine is a robust, well-presented collection of essays that traverses a surprisingly broad range of topics within its umbrella of ‘maternity and medicine’. In particular, Gayle Davis’ essay on infertility (which examines Scottish medical responses to artificial insemination in mid-twentieth-century Scotland) and Allison L. Hepler’s essay on workplace health are both refreshing inclusions in this volume, showing the potential for further scholarship that this fascinating subject area offers.

 

Posted in Book of the Month, News | Comments closed

Holiday Greetings from The British Scholar Society

The British Scholar Society would like to wish its members, contributors, conference goers, and newsletter readers a very happy holiday season.

The Society had a productive and successful 2015, and we are excited to build on our accomplishments in the coming year. A 2015 retrospective and information on what we can look forward to in 2016 will be in the next edition of the newsletter.

We would also like to provide a quick reminder of the deadline for abstract submissions to the 2016 Britain and the World Conference in London. Submissions must be received by 4 January 2016 for a guarantee of consideration. More information on the submission process and on the planned conference events can be found at http://britishscholar.org/conference-2016/.

Again, from all of us here at The British Scholar Society, please accept our good wishes and hopes for your families, your work, and yourselves—now and in the coming year!

Posted in News | Comments closed